Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer Kim Wawer new images and additional content of the “Dig-project” is being updated...


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Dear D,
It was a pleasure to meet you, my time with you reminded me that we were near these, that made me feel calm, and in the mood of eating mussels. But jet during my stay, I felt as if I was interrupting you, I guess it was because you were carrying a lot of weight on your shoulders at the time. Our meeting was loaded with political conflict but that was not your fault, i admired how you stood tall between all of them, all the chaos that you where not part of. You provided network, connections to other places, your openness made it easy to project or imagine those other places. (not a lot of places are so generous) I hear from someone that birds liked to visit you before, I guess they still do, but they just shapeshifted somewhat. The reason why I’m writing you is because I wanted to apologise for leaving you so early, without really getting to know you. I guess I was afraid to get too close.

All the best and good luck to you,
Kim





Ijburg—
14:12 -
There are no animals in this ground, that shows the soullessness character of this material. It’s like I'm meeting a very grey person, hoping to find something interesting to talk about. It is obvious that ground is not alive. I do still think it's nice to sit in the pit, with my eye height on the ground level. it's anice place to Be, even though it is a bit lonely and empty. Camera is dead, have to charge again. Maybe I can still do something about the shape later.






Mark

4. Loren Eiseley





LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Yet whenever I see a frog’s eye low in the water warily ogling the shoreward landscape, I always think inconsequentially of those twiddling mechanical eyes that mankind manipulates nightly from a thousand observatories. Someday, with a telescopic lens an acre in extent, we are going to see something not to out liking, some looming shape outside there across the great pond of space.
            Whenever I catch a frog’s eye I am aware of this, but I do not find it depressing. I stand quite still and try hard not to move or lift a hand since it would only frighten him. And standing thus it finally comes to me that this is the most enormous extension of vision of which life is capable: the projection of itself into other lives. This is the lonely magnificent power of humanity. It is, far more than any spatial adventure, the supreme epitome of the reaching out.
Mark